Newly released video footage shows law enforcement officers mocking Tony Timpa, an unarmed man who had called 911 for his own help, as he lay dying.

Dallas police ignored his repeated cries as they pinned him to the ground, mocked him for passing out, and neglected to get him any medical care.

Timpa, 32, called 911 from a parking lot, begging help and claiming he was afraid. He informed the dispatcher that he had schizophrenia and depression, that he was off his medication, and that he had taken drugs. 

Internal records, police reported that Timpa was combative during the incident, and officers only used enough physical force to prevent a distressed Timpa from rolling into a busy street - but the release bodycam footage paints a different picture.

A handcuffed Timpa is heard yelling, "you're gonna kill me." reportedly more than 30 times. As he rolls around in distress, Timpa is pinned to the ground by his knees, neck, and shoulders. "You're OK, you're OK," one officer says. They then mock his driver's license.

He is then held in the "prone position" for more than 13 minutes before falling unconscious.

An officer asks, "Is he asleep?" and another laughs. "He's snoring, that's what it was."

"Tony," one officer says, "it's time for school, wake up."

Another says, "I don't want to go to school, Mom. Five more minutes, Mom." Others laugh. Another officer joins in: "First day, you can't be late!"

An officer shakes him before telling him, "We bought you new shoes for the first day of school, come on." More laughter. A third: "We made breakfast, scrambled eggs, your favorite. With waffles." 

A grand jury indicted the officers on charges of misdemeanor deadly conduct and concluded that the officers “engaged in reckless conduct” but, the Dallas County district attorney dismissed the charges, citing testimony from medical examiners.

 Dallas Police Department disciplined the three officers, placing them on administrative leave after finding they had acted in a way that discredited the department but they returned to active duty in April after the criminal charges were dropped.